she devil

binkshapiro:

this is the best thing i’ve ever seen

binkshapiro:

this is the best thing i’ve ever seen

(via bathbug)

latino-diversity:

An Afro Bolivian woman and her baby
Afro Bolivians are unique in that they’ve adopted many of cultural practices, traditions, and attire of the Aymara people who are the largest Indigenous group native to Bolivia. Most Afro Bolivians not only speak Spanish but also the Aymara language fluently.

latino-diversity:

An Afro Bolivian woman and her baby

Afro Bolivians are unique in that they’ve adopted many of cultural practices, traditions, and attire of the Aymara people who are the largest Indigenous group native to Bolivia. Most Afro Bolivians not only speak Spanish but also the Aymara language fluently.

(via weareallmixedup)

think-thank-thunk:

*holds own titty for comfort*

(via voguememoirs)

ultravioletrai:

satsuma400ml:

accras:

[1] [2] [3]

Perfect

:’)))

This is being aware that the media you create helps shape the minds of many viewers and society as a whole. Especially the very impressionable minds of young ones.

God bless Sesame Street.

(Source: lemonyandbeatrice, via fuckyourracism)

marimopet:

Kailua Noon - Pegge Hopper

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

image

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

(via princessbunni)

zodiacbaby:

i wanna live away from sex and people who are interested in being cool like can i just live in a john william waterhouse painting and finally be at fucking peace 

(via janemba)

zgmfd:

UFO Polaroids

(via strophess)

  • Mom: [yells at me for 35 minutes]
  • Me: But-
  • Mom: No this conversation is over.
  • Mom: [proceeds to yell for another 35 minutes]

micdotcom:

The Miss Indian World pageant is the answer to Miss America we’ve been looking for

When Kira Kazantsev was crowned the new Miss America on Sunday night, a feeling of déjá vu set in.

Not only was she white — like all but nine of the 94 winners before her — she also fit snugly into a narrowly defined standard of Western female attractiveness: early 20s, long flowing hair and a thin, painstakingly tanned physique that would not seem out of place in a Victoria’s Secret catalog.

In many ways, the Miss Indian World pageant’s definition of what American beauty truly entails is the ideological antithesis to Miss America. Indeed, since 1984, this five-day competition based in Albuquerque, N.M., has honored Native American woman for their contributions to their communities, not their bikini bodies. The top award is given to the contestant who “best represents her culture,” according to Al Jazeera.

Why this pageant is world’s better 

(via thisisnotlatinx)

banditblossom:

jsyk, only 2.9% of the population in Canada is black, and yet black Canadians makes 80% of prisons and are mostly likely to get mistreated in them

tell me again racism doesn’t exist Canada. (: 

(via reverseracism)

ghostrightsactivist:

cakeandrevolution:

I want to see a reality tv show where straight dudes have to read the shitty messages they send to women to their mothers.

to catch a redditor

(via whybenedict)

kemetic-dreams:

Yes sir see you there

kemetic-dreams:

Yes sir see you there

(via reverseracism)

the-psycho-cutie:

i didn’t realize growing up meant dying inside but hey it’s whatever

(via voguememoirs)

koreanmodel:

Kim Wonjung for KYE Spring 2015 lookbook

koreanmodel:

Kim Wonjung for KYE Spring 2015 lookbook

(via yaoifuck)